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Rejoice Radio[RBN], coming at you from Pensacola Christian College is conducting a clever fund-raising scam .Do not participate in your own demise . Do not contribute to the downfall of the Christian faith in America.

March 21, 2017

My Dear Christian people: .. Many of you are faithful listeners to the various Christian Broadcasters found across the radio dial . Many of you trust these religion promoters on a sight unseen basis ;and that  ,has sadly   contributed to the fall of Christianity in the popular culture of this country… The reason is simple enough to understand once you begin to assess the nature of this dilemma. ..

The Chinese have a proverb that makes perfect sense when you finally decide to understand the nature of the peril we all face.

” To properly understand something , you must first know what to call it”

When you come face to face with the many  thousands of wealthy Christian fundamentalists pitching their pseudo Christian appeals on radio or television ,do you really know what to call them?

Do you take them at their word  that they are men of god performing their role  in the mass media and providing you with a ministry , consisting of music and messaging ; which will enhance your Christian experience?
Do you really know what to call their so-called ministry?
If you do not  then you are  part of the problem that all true Christians face in America. .

The problem affecting the masses today is the dumbing down of all those who  have misplaced their trust in all those who are performing the duties of vultures and hyenas ripping off the gullible and easy to fool members of the Christian community in America.

REJOICE RADIO will soon be conducting a fund-raising scam they lovingly call :A{ Share a Thon]
Nothing could be further from the truth.

What these jokers ,running things at RBN are doing ,is conducting a required head count ,hoping for an increase in listenership which then allows them to obtain additional funding from the local banks along the beautiful Florida coastline . Pensacola Florida, is prime real estate for building expensive new homes. Those in the Christian community gullible enough to believe the fraud and major deceit that RBN is putting over the heads of their listeners, are in reality , participating in their own swindle.

Those stupid enough to make a pledge or to even use their credit cards to donate cash are truly the most stupidest of the bible belt happy clappy crowd of imbeciles, without whom most of these filthy lying Televangelists and scheming radio evangelists would wither away and go with the wind.

” If you want to properly understand something ,you must first know what to call it”
Maybe it’s time to follow this advice .

Once you know what to call the phony baloney so-called ministry of RBN you will be less inclined to send in your money. Why would any intelligent Christian give these hustlers a dime when in fact they will use any cash or pledges to enhance their financial situation at your expense?
RBN is a clever and deceitful enterprise whereby wealthy investors use the legal benefits which accrue to any charity or faith ministry for their financial benefit and nothing more.

Best way to prove this is to ask : what charity has RBN ever participated in over the years?
When was the last time they advised their donors where their money was spent and how much they paid out in salaries?

When did they tell all the idiots who have supported them in the past and whom they now refer to as SHARE PARTNERS how much money is paid out to Mr. Craig Mattson,Rhonda Autry or Mr. Jimmy Mintz?
These folks seem to hide in the shadows and run from the light.

And this doesn’t include all the other parasites getting rich simply by investing in RBN and reaping a harvest of financial rewards. This doesn’t include all the administrative staff keeping their seats warm and getting rich while those in the donor class, under the cloud of delusion and abject stupidity listening at home, fail to realize how deep the swindle goes and how gravely they are being cheated and lied to. These usual suspects and idiots suffer economic hardships while the vultures at Rejoice Radio are living it up everyday of the week.
Ever wonder what happens to cash donations they get in the mail?
That’s when everyone starts to howl with delight. Cash is always good and is seldom used for anything other than for the staff, including Mr. Mattson,Rhonda Autry and Mr. Jimmy Mintz to leave the Rejoice Radio Studio compound and enjoy a fabulous seafood dining of which Pensacola is famous for. Pensacola is also known for being something of a flesh pot in Northern Florida , and enjoyed greatly by all the horny fundamentalists looking to add some carnal delights to their Christian lifestyle.

The truth is that all of the phony games of scriptural charades you hear being promoted on REJOICE RADIO are designed to convince you they are a true Christian ministry which of course they are not.
Anyone with half a brain knows they are appealing to your sense of Christian sentimentality to weaken your thinking process enabling them to better deceive you and to cheat you . DO NOT FALL FOR IT!

READ ABOUT A TRULY SUCCESSFUL FRAUD AND LEARN HOW THINGS ARE DONE AT REJOICE BROADCAST NETWORK USING RBN AS A FUND RAISING OUTREACH AND PHONY MINISTRY:

Wealth of Minister Kenneth Copeland And Family Scrutinized

       

NEWARK, Texas | Here in the gentle hills of north Texas, televangelist Kenneth Copeland has built a religious empire teaching that God wants his followers to prosper.
By ERIC GORSKITHE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWARK, Texas | Here in the gentle hills of north Texas, televangelist Kenneth Copeland has built a religious empire teaching that God wants his followers to prosper.

Over the years, a circle of Copeland’s relatives and friends have done just that, The Associated Press has found. They include the brother-in-law with a lucrative deal to broker Copeland’s television time, the son who acquired church-owned land for his ranching business and saw it more than quadruple in value, and board members who together have been paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for speaking at church events.

Church officials say no one improperly benefits through ties to Copeland’s vast evangelical ministry, which claims more than 600,000 subscribers in 134 countries to its flagship “Believer’s Voice of Victory” magazine. The board of directors signs off on important matters, they say. Yet church bylaws give Copeland veto power over board decisions.

While Copeland insists his ministry complies with the law, independent tax experts who reviewed information obtained by the AP through interviews, church documents and public records have their doubts. The web of companies and non-profits tied to the televangelist calls the ministry’s integrity into question, they say.

‘RED FLAGS ALL OVER’

“There are far too many relatives here,” said Frances Hill, a University of Miami law professor who specializes in nonprofit tax law. “There’s too much money sloshing around and too much of it sloshing around with people with overlapping affiliations and allegiances by either blood or friendship or just ties over the years. There are red flags all over these relationships.”

Neither Kenneth Copeland nor John Copeland, Kenneth’s son and the ministry’s executive director, responded to interview requests.

Kenneth Copeland, 71, is a pioneer of the prosperity gospel, which teaches that believers are destined to flourish spiritually, physically and financially – and share the wealth with others.

His ministry’s 1,500-acre campus outside Fort Worth is testament to his success. It includes a church, private airstrip, a hangar for the ministry’s aircraft and a $6 million, church-owned mansion.

SENATE INVESTIGATING

Already a well-known figure, Copeland has come under greater scrutiny in recent months. He is one target of a Senate Finance Committee investigation into allegations of questionable spending and lax financial accountability at six large televangelist organizations that preach health-and-wealth theology.

All have denied wrongdoing, but Copeland has fought back the hardest, refusing to answer most questions from the inquiry’s architect, Republican Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa.

The Senate committee didn’t set out to determine whether Copeland or the others broke the law, although it could provide information to the Internal Revenue Service if something seems flagrantly wrong, a committee aide said. The main goal, Grassley has said, is to figure out whether existing tax laws governing churches are adequate, which could carry sweeping implications for all religious organizations.

The committee could subpoena Copeland if he remains uncooperative. Neither he nor John Copeland, his son and the ministry’s chief executive officer, responded to interview requests.

ONCE A POP SINGER

A one-time pop singer, Copeland had a born-again experience and enrolled at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Okla. He worked as a pilot and chauffeur for Roberts himself.

He describes hearing his own call to preach standing in a dried-up riverbed.

Now a 500-employee operation with a budget in the tens of millions, Kenneth Copeland Ministries has won supporters worldwide through its conferences, prayer request network, disaster relief work, magazine and television program.

Kenneth Copeland Ministries is organized under the tax code as a church, so it gets a layer of privacy not afforded large secular and religious nonprofit groups that must disclose budgets and salaries. Pastors’ pay must be “reasonable” under the federal tax code.

Copeland’s current salary is not made public by his ministry. However, the church disclosed in a property-tax exemption application that his wages were $364,577 in 1995; Copeland’s wife, Gloria, earned $292,593.

The Copeland family, however, is involved in ventures

Wealth of Minister Kenneth Copeland And Family Scrutinized

Hide caption
TELEVANGELISTS GLORIA AND KENNETH COPELAND lay hands on Oral Roberts, then 85, on June 18, 2003. – KELLY KERR | TULSA WORLD

Monday
Posted Jul 28, 2008 at 1:01 AM
Updated Jul 28, 2008 at 10:28 PM

       

NEWARK, Texas | Here in the gentle hills of north Texas, televangelist Kenneth Copeland has built a religious empire teaching that God wants his followers to prosper.
By ERIC GORSKITHE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWARK, Texas | Here in the gentle hills of north Texas, televangelist Kenneth Copeland has built a religious empire teaching that God wants his followers to prosper.

Over the years, a circle of Copeland’s relatives and friends have done just that, The Associated Press has found. They include the brother-in-law with a lucrative deal to broker Copeland’s television time, the son who acquired church-owned land for his ranching business and saw it more than quadruple in value, and board members who together have been paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for speaking at church events.

Church officials say no one improperly benefits through ties to Copeland’s vast evangelical ministry, which claims more than 600,000 subscribers in 134 countries to its flagship “Believer’s Voice of Victory” magazine. The board of directors signs off on important matters, they say. Yet church bylaws give Copeland veto power over board decisions.

While Copeland insists his ministry complies with the law, independent tax experts who reviewed information obtained by the AP through interviews, church documents and public records have their doubts. The web of companies and non-profits tied to the televangelist calls the ministry’s integrity into question, they say.

‘RED FLAGS ALL OVER’

“There are far too many relatives here,” said Frances Hill, a University of Miami law professor who specializes in nonprofit tax law. “There’s too much money sloshing around and too much of it sloshing around with people with overlapping affiliations and allegiances by either blood or friendship or just ties over the years. There are red flags all over these relationships.”

Neither Kenneth Copeland nor John Copeland, Kenneth’s son and the ministry’s executive director, responded to interview requests.

Kenneth Copeland, 71, is a pioneer of the prosperity gospel, which teaches that believers are destined to flourish spiritually, physically and financially – and share the wealth with others.

His ministry’s 1,500-acre campus outside Fort Worth is testament to his success. It includes a church, private airstrip, a hangar for the ministry’s aircraft and a $6 million, church-owned mansion.

SENATE INVESTIGATING

Already a well-known figure, Copeland has come under greater scrutiny in recent months. He is one target of a Senate Finance Committee investigation into allegations of questionable spending and lax financial accountability at six large televangelist organizations that preach health-and-wealth theology.

All have denied wrongdoing, but Copeland has fought back the hardest, refusing to answer most questions from the inquiry’s architect, Republican Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa.

The Senate committee didn’t set out to determine whether Copeland or the others broke the law, although it could provide information to the Internal Revenue Service if something seems flagrantly wrong, a committee aide said. The main goal, Grassley has said, is to figure out whether existing tax laws governing churches are adequate, which could carry sweeping implications for all religious organizations.

The committee could subpoena Copeland if he remains uncooperative. Neither he nor John Copeland, his son and the ministry’s chief executive officer, responded to interview requests.

ONCE A POP SINGER

A one-time pop singer, Copeland had a born-again experience and enrolled at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Okla. He worked as a pilot and chauffeur for Roberts himself.

He describes hearing his own call to preach standing in a dried-up riverbed.

Now a 500-employee operation with a budget in the tens of millions, Kenneth Copeland Ministries has won supporters worldwide through its conferences, prayer request network, disaster relief work, magazine and television program.

Kenneth Copeland Ministries is organized under the tax code as a church, so it gets a layer of privacy not afforded large secular and religious nonprofit groups that must disclose budgets and salaries. Pastors’ pay must be “reasonable” under the federal tax code.

Copeland’s current salary is not made public by his ministry. However, the church disclosed in a property-tax exemption application that his wages were $364,577 in 1995; Copeland’s wife, Gloria, earned $292,593.

The Copeland family, however, is involved in ventures

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